Climate Letter #1078

Global temperature trends follow three separate trails, one for El Nino years, one for La Ninas and one neutral, depending on the relative warmth of each type.  Here they are all nicely charted for comparison by Dana Nuccitelli.  2017, with a neutral rating, was the second warmest on record for all years, beaten by just one El Nino year, in 2016.  The aggregate chart since 1964 shows no sign of any meaningful pause other than those that are common and temporary, and the trend may even be viewed as accelerating.  We need a strong La Nina year or two to clarify the current position of the lower boundary.
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Over 15,000 of the world’s scientists have signed off on a new warning to humanity.  The original statement of this type was published 25 years ago, in 1992.  The new one includes nine charts of what has transpired since then.  Scientists have a unique ability to understand the true magnitude of what is happening to the planet, and to all of life, and what we humans are doing that is damaging to both of these.  Those of us who are not scientists would do well to pursue as much knowledge as we can about what they have to say, for a better glimpse of that magnitude.
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A representative of another group, not limited to scientists, has issued a follow-up statement to the above message.  It’s hard to disagree with his idea that the limits of growth have already been reached, if not breached, but the recommendations that follow are not likely to gain much leverage unless (or until?) signs of disaster become overwhelming.
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Five practical ways to improve global climate mitigation at the policy level.  All of these represent actions that have been seriously talked about but never formalized into concrete plans.  Filling in these gaps would give the Paris Agreement a better chance of making good on its promises.
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How farmers in Nepal are experiencing climate change.  There is a warming trend in the Himalayas similar to that in the Arctic, causing erratic and unmanageable changes for those who have farms on the lower slopes.  It offers another example of what is meant by “abrupt” climate change, of a type that can happen anywhere.
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Wild animals are badly in need of places to live (Yale e360).  Right now there are many that are just barely hanging on.  Conservationists are coming up with a number of helpful ideas that work well even on a small scale.
Carl
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