Climate Letter #1053

How the effects of climate change are destroying a key link in the marine food chain.  Zooplankton are tiny aquatic animals that feed voraciously on phytoplankton, which originate the bulk of oceanic food supply through photosynthesis.  Their quantity is now being seriously threatened in several ways. “Without them, we break the food chain.  There’s no way to transfer the energy from phytoplankton to the fish, and all the other animals we’re familiar with, without zooplankton.”
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Testament to a story about humanity’s impact on the planet.  How a graduate student quickly learned to appreciate all of the destructive forces that make up the Anthropocene, including carbon emissions:
–This is the link to that article, as published by the Guardian in 2016, still fully relevant:
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An update on the current rate of expansion of plastic waste, which along with other types of oceanic pollution is a key marker of the Anthropocene:
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Nuclear weapons testing, now in a state of sharp decline, is a major component of the Anthropocene that has created markers of the most highly durable type.  This piece of photojournalism from ABC News tells what life is like on Enewetak Atoll, part of the Marshall Islands, where a huge amount of nuclear waste lies buried within a concrete tomb that is now threatened by rising sea level.  (The story is beautifully done, should win a prize.)
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Road building, which may or may not be a permanent part of the geological record, is nevertheless a major contributor to the planetary destabilization that constitutes the Anthropocene, as explained herein by Climate News Network.  “Within the next 30 years, according to two scientists, there could be another 25 million kilometres of road worldwide – enough to encircle the planet 600 times.” The wide-ranging damage from this activity is monumental.
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Mercedes-Benz has been quietly developing a whole array of electric trucks and buses.  One model is already on the road, with UPS being one of the first customers.
Carl
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